Even as I write this I know my voice will get lost; that there must be upwards of a hundred thousand blogs on this same subject, with this same view, by now.  But sometimes the fingers have to write.  That is nature.

We need to use this word ‘democracy’ with care.  If something is worth having, it is worth nurturing, venerating, bringing into being.  It should never be entrusted to those who seek power, because power does not have a voice in a democracy:  only wisdom should have a voice.

In truth, all ideals in modern society are reduced to emotive words.  They mean precisely nothing, because each one of them is  just a tool subjugated to the will of those who seek power.   And if they are ever to gain credence (personally I don’t believe they ever had it) it will require a seed change so entire that world revolution will seem a paltry description.   Old idealist that I am, I believe the web could be the means to that change:  one language to bring the world of real people together.  But in the meantime….

So ‘bailiffs’ have moved in on the St. Paul’s occupation (worth mentioning, incidentally, that the Occupy London movement never intended to be there – their target was the City itself and the Bank of England, I believe.  they were herded there in the first place by the police) – interesting word, ‘bailiff’.   A faceless word.   Who are they, these minions of the State?   Years ago in the miners’ strike Margaret Thatcher proved you could make anyone a policeman just by putting the right coloured coat on their back, so what coloured coat does a bailiff wear?  Underneath, what are they?  Army?

You see where I’m going.   England just had its very comfortable, very English little Prague Spring, all done with that panache of which the faceless ones who rule us are so proud:  so utterly British, so appreciated by the country at large who never experience the brutishness of the traditional English copper, who have never been ‘kettled’ until they can’t breathe.  And so controlled in its media exposure that its truth is scarcely seen.

We have learned a lot since Peterloo, since ‘Derry.  But where progress is concerned, we seem to have moved forward not one step.