Apparently, we have all been eating horse. Now I personally think that’s OK, because many nationalities (of course, whenever we say that we mean the French) have been eating it for years without noticeable damage. But a lot of news people have been trying to get us really upset.
As someone who loves food and cooking, I tend to take offence anyway at the very sight of a ‘frozen lasagne’. The name is faintly distasteful, and I would be profoundly unsurprised if its meat ingredient was woolly mammoth, but I wouldn’t know by eating it. I wouldn’t know if I was eating rabbit, or hedgehog, or armadillo; because the soulless grit interleaved with sheet rubber that is intended to pass for meat has no taste, just texture.Alpine Cow
I am much more engaged by human vicissitudes in the matter of taste. Why, for example, do we place meat higher on our list of preferences than offal? Liver particularly is rich in nutrients, but few will profess to like it for itself. Then, why do we make such a distinction between the horse and, say, the cow? How often do you hear the phrase ‘I love horses’? How often do you hear the phrase ‘I love cows’? Cows are intelligent, gentle creatures: suppose somebody, a thousand or so years ago, had decided to saddle up a Herefordshire instead of a Roan?
When we started bestowing our favours upon certain breeds, certain species because of such nebulous attributes as looks or the ability to bring back a dead pheasant we began playing havoc with nature, and we are still doing it! Lost in the wilderness, we’d be prepared to eat anything, but couched in our ivory tower of Western luxury we are prepared to waste almost everything.
Is it time, perhaps, to recover our balance?